Ayesha Curry teaches us that in the age of oversharing, transparency is not always best

Ayesha Curry teaches us that in the age of oversharing, transparency is not always best

Article By Ann Landry // EEW Magazine // Spiritual

Once upon a time, you could tell your truth, be open and heard, without fear of instant backlash. But that day is no more.

Ayesha Curry, Christian chef, cookbook author, and wife of NBA player Stephen Curry was lambasted on social media for a recent revelation that she desires male attention from men other than her husband and sometimes feels insecure because many beautiful women compete for her megastar spouse’s affection.

It was a very raw, real and bold thing to confess on the Jada Pinkett-Smith hosted #1 web series, “Red Table Talk.”

Curry’s sentiments about being “bothered” that she received “zero male attention,” opened her up to the vitriolic assault of many mean-spirited critics worldwide. Some even went so far as to cast the 30-year-old restaurateur as an attention-starved, needy, low-self-esteem-suffering, spoiled, ungrateful, rich housewife.

Really, guys? Was all that necessary?

In fairness, many were genuinely confused by her comments and were not looking to harm the typically bubbly social star. They wondered aloud about why a Christian wife would be worried about what men, who are not her husband, think about her.

Such explanations are hers alone to give.

Speaking of giving, the ridiculed CEO did provide a response to her criticizers and detractors. She wrote on Instagram, “I have never been one to cage my feelings and emotions to any capacity. I am human. It brings me pure joy to speak my mind, be vulnerable at times and to know myself inside and out.”

She added, “I really want to take the time to encourage everyone to speak their truth regardless of perception, fitting into a mold or offending someone, because it’s YOUR truth. And that’s okay!”

For Curry, whose skin has been made somewhat thicker than the average individual by the harshness of fame, may be better able to handle being surrounded by such an intense level of controversy. For the everyday person, speaking freely and so openly just may not be the best policy.

Unless you are feeling led by God to bare your soul, keep in mind the instructions in 1 Corinthians 6:12, which says, "‘I have the right to do anything,’ you say—but not everything is beneficial.”

To reiterate, Curry was well within her rights to say what was on her mind, and to be honest, she handled all the blowback amazingly well. For everyone else, take a moment to step back before venting about deeply personal feelings and issues publicly. After all, context and nuance get lost on lots of folks these days, particularly because we consume information in soundbytes, failing to listen and read closely.

Though Curry argued that women should “not suppress and compress our feelings and thoughts,” sometimes, suppression is necessary. Proverbs 13:3 says, “Those who guard their lips preserve their lives, but those who speak rashly will come to ruin.”

1 Thessalonians 4:11 says that we should “study to be quiet.” So then, in this age of over-sharing, transparency is not always best, even if those are your true feelings.

While you should never fear people (Matthew 10:28), you must be wise. Some matters, emotions, thoughts, and opinions should be reserved for those who love you, truly care for you and will cover you.

In moments when you really need to vent and are looking for a shoulder to cry on, Hebrews 4:16 says, go to Jesus and you will “obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need.”

Take your issues to the Lord in prayer and leave them there. By the way, God is the best secret-keeper and issue-rectifier anywhere!


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